Eavan Boland Poetry #3

We continue our jaunt through the poetry of Eavan Boland.
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12 responses to “Eavan Boland Poetry #3

  1. Stacy!

    It has been a while since we have blogged! This week we continued in our venture to discover the underlying meanings in Boland’s mysterious and thoughtful poems. Today we discussed the poem ‘It’s A Woman’s World’, and to be honest, there are so many interpretations that have emerged from this particular poem – mostly since it has a bit of a feminist tone even in the title itself. The first slide presented to us made me consider the fact that she was commenting on the consistent, almost mediocre rituals of our daily lives. It is predictable, routine. The second slide presented an interesting line, “wheels are steadier, but we’re the same” sounds like she believes the fact that technology has revolved, but human ways have remained unchanged. It almost seems as if she critiques that although our ‘toys’ have become larger, faster, stronger, human nature has not been ameliorated. By far, however, the most interesting slide to me was slide 3, the third part of the poem, when it says “we are defined by what we forget, by what we will never be.” In a more general interpretation, I would say that Boland hints on the fact that people tend to look upon failure instead of all the accomplishments they have made. While it is easy to acknowledge the achievement of the individual, human nature is prone to fuss over shortcomings rather than success. IN a feminist perspective, I think this part suggests that women were and are not truly appreciated in society. For instance, history shows how women have taken active role in participating in national duties while the men fight in war. In World War 2, women were appreciated and encouraged to be a part of the labor force, assuming jobs that they could only dream of prior to that period of time. However, once the men come back, it is as if the mindset of ‘women inferiority’ can never be forgotten, thus, the return of the alpha males degrade the social status of women all over again. Although the 21st century has seen incredibly progression of women’s rights, there is still inequality that is fostered, especially in less educated, less developed countries. The line ‘we were never on the scene of the crime’ almost suggests that Boland wished that women could be a part of the crime, but society outlawed that possibility. All in all, I think this was one of Boland’s more intriguing poems.

  2. Nick

    This week we studied more of Eavan Boland’s poems. The one that I found the most interesting was “It’s a Woman’s World”. The first thing that popped up in my mind was James Brown’s “It’s a Man’s World” because its basically the total opposite of the poem’s title. I first thought that it was going to be about how women were oppressed and they were actually the reason why the world can function. I thought it would be slightly feministic, but after reading it through, it was actually a poem about how women the women’s role has been unchanged throughout time. It somewhat goes against the beliefs of modern society where women and men both have more equal rights and opportunities than ever before.

    Even though it may be harsh, the stereotypical image of women is generally quite accurate. Of course there have been some exceptions where women have been greater in power than men, but for the most of history and even up till today, men rule over women. Women’s rights have definitely improved, but women are still seen as the caretakers of the home. To society, even workingwoman with families still has an additional job in the home. I think in a sense that even though women have been given opportunities, society only gives it to them if they can still fulfill their role as the “keeper of the hearth”.

    I especially liked the part where Boland says that women will never be “star-gazers or fire-eaters”. I didn’t really understand it at first but then as I tried to conjure an image of them, I realized that in my mind, they were both males that fulfilled those jobs. An old, Greek, male philosopher came to my mind, perhaps it was an image of Plato, Aristotle or any of the other elevated thinkers of the past age. When I thought of a fire-eater, I thought of a half naked, male Polynesian fire-dancer, twirling a stick with flames on either end. There is a sense of aggression and bravery on his face, which are usually thought of as male characteristics. Only later on did I realize Boland used these two jobs to show that women usually aren’t associated with the characteristics of either of these jobs; they aren’t seen as thinkers or risk-takers.

    After reading this poem, there was a much greater impact on me than if I had read a more feministic poem. This was one of the poems that I more thoroughly enjoyed.

    What I also liked when we studied the poem was the method to which we do so. I liked breaking it down to parts and writing all my thoughts upon the segment. That way, even if I had questions, most of the time I could answer the questions with further reading. It helped me a lot because I had a lot of questions when reading through. After reading what I had written altogether, I had a sudden epiphany and I could answer a lot of my previous questions.

  3. Karen

    The great thing about the Pomegranate was that I could actually understand it. When I was little, I would spend my leisure time reading Greek mythology. I had this big book of Greek myths for children, and inside that book was the story of Persephone and Hades. I remember thinking as a kid that Persephone wasn’t so smart- why then would she be eating that damning (literally) pomegranate?

    Pomegranate, the poem, tells its own story, with a not-so-smart daughter as well. We get the sense that Boland’s daughter wants to conform to conformity – losing the culture and the history that makes her unique, and swapping it for the vapidity and inanity of teen magazines. Boland writes about the seasons of summer and winter – summer representing the ‘good old days’ where her daughter was her own, winter representing the time when her daughter turned to teenage version of Hades.
    Boland’s daughter was hungry for her forbidden fruit, for her pomegranate. And it’s not hard to understand why. It is part of human nature to want to feel accepted; this desire is particularly amplified in the formative years of teenage-hood. Boland has an epiphany when she sees her daughter asleep with magazines and Coke. She writes, “The pomegranate! How did I forget it?” Boland forgets that the little girl she carried that summer twilight would turn into an impressionable maiden drawn to the irresistible lure of the forbidden fruit – not because she doesn’t know that this will happen, but because she does not want to accept that it will.

    As a mother, Boland debates with herself the merits and demerits of cloistering her daughter, of forcibly emphasizing her Irish heritage. In the end she decides not to. She calls her daughter’s youth this ‘beautiful rift in time’, and I agree with her. In our youth, it is inevitable that we make mistakes, but it’s these mistakes that make us who we are as people. Youth is a beautiful thing-it’s a time where we are free to explore ourselves, to find ourselves. Boland sees that, just as she predicts that her daughter will enter the legend in her own time. To cloister her would ‘diminish the gift’ of youth, and diminish the realization that her heritage is just as much a part of who she is as her youthful times are.

  4. Jason

    I’ve always been a strong supporter for communities that tried to fight for equality, whether it is the African Americans, the LGBT community or women. The first thing that came to my mind when I read Eavan Boland’s “It’s a Woman’s World” was the song “It’s a Man’s World” probably because of such similarity and contrast at the same time between the two titles. Boland’s poem had indeed captured my heart even though I am not a woman. I am drawn and endear to her gusto in highlighting and encouraging women to embrace their inner strength and be proud of whom they are as women. As a person, I always admire those who work hard, persevere and willing to fight for their beliefs.

    As I read on, for some reason, Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” and “Natural Woman”, as well as many other soulful songs from the 60s and 70s came to my mind. This is probably because for me, Aretha Franklin is an epitome of a strong and powerful woman. Not only that, I think the fact that African Americans were fighting for their rights during the 60s. Therefore that sense of empowerment that women would get from Boland’s poem, draws parallel to that during the 60s exhibited by African Americans of that time – at least according to me.

    I also think that the poem somehow took you back in retrospect. Especially when Balond compares women today to historical females when she stated how “like most historic people, we are defined by what we forget”. Historic people are defined by their greatness, which is something that these women, whom Boland was addressing, were lacking. Boland invited all these women that they too are historical figures as they help made the world go around. In light of history, women had indeed played a role in history, most importantly in women’s suffrage. Not only that, that line also somehow highlighted the marks women made in history including those of Amelia Earhart’s, Rosa Park’s, Mother Theressa’s or even drawing from our culture today Lady Gaga’s and Madonna’s. Through this, reader would get that sense of empowerment. Despite the fact that women may have less rigorous jobs than men (as stated in the poem), they should not be treated any less than them. And through these, Boland was able to show her desires for women to awaken to their passion for equality in intelligence, respect and love.

    Yet, one of the most interesting this about this poem was her parallel between male and female. She stated how women would never be fire-eaters as it is too rigorous, but in the end she shows how one of her friends has a “burning plume”. Also, these fire-eaters symbolize the passion for equality within women and their potential power and therefore, the lines, “our windows moth our children to the flame of hearth not history,” portrays the strength and power of women since they are the ones that their children run to. It is also implied that women have an eternal flame for equality and the desire to overcome societal limitations. As a male, I am not the slightest offended by Boland’s poem. Instead, her poem had a didactic tone behind it and I feel ‘informed’ by her poem. Additionally, I empathized with her cause and is somehow ‘empowered’ and willing to fight for it, even though I am not directly affected.

  5. Patricia

    After what seemed like ages since we last had normal classes, we are finally able to return back to normal and discuss about poems again. This week, the poem that intrigues me is the poem ‘it’s a Woman’s World’ by Eavan Boland. From this poem, our class seemed to have come to an agreement that the poem is about how Boland was trying to express how women hasn’t changed throughout time. Some interpreted the title ‘It’s a Woman’s world’ as something familiar and cliché, and I think that the title was kind of symbolizing how women’s role hasn’t changed over time – as if they’re a form of cliché.
    The title was reflected in the poem on how women hasn’t changed ‘since a wheel first whetted a knife’ – which was a long long time ago. As I read on, and listened throughout the discussion, I realized, Boland made so many generalizations on the perception towards women: the phrase ‘but ‘we’re the same’ points out how women remained the same throughout the different changes in time, “of the loaf left…..the was left wet” seems to imply how women are boring and they do the same task and mistakes, and their main tasks were percived to be only cooking and gossiping, and women settline for less than what they’re capable of, because of what the society expects.
    What really caught my attention was how I could really sense the author’s voice in lines ‘Like most historic peoples we are defined by what we forget, by what we never will be: star-gazers, fire – eaters. It’s our alibi”. The reason these lines caught my attention, was because of how vivid the author’s voice is, in this part of the poem. I later noticed how much ‘we’ and ‘our’ was used in this part of the poem; it seems as if the Boland was using alot of first person to imply how she thinks women were perceived as historically invisible, and they are bound by that standard; that they would never be able to achieve such high standards. This generalization bothers me.
    Eavan Boland is a 21st century writer who is still alive enough to see how women these days receives more respect then they were back then, and has as much right to pursue their interests (well, perhaps not so for those living in the middle east and probably asians with asian-mindset too). Yet, Asia and Middle East is not physically and culturally close to Eavan Boland who lived in Europe and the United States where women receives their rights. In fact, there are numerous women who did significant things, and are well aware of politics and other human sciences issues in the places they live in. Therefore such generalizations by Eavan Boland was only true to a small extent. This made me wonder: who was Eavan Boland’s target audience? Why was she making such generalizations? was the generalizations intended to be easily noticed by the audience? If so, for what purpose?
    I think that Eavan Boland have a certain intention in writing this poem.

  6. Hartini - HI DONT READ THE PREVIOUS ONE. i accidentally spliced it with abit of a different document hahaha

    This week, we continued in the discussion of Eavan Boland poems, two of which made quite a lasting impression of me.
    The first of the two is The Pomegranate. The poem starts off with a reference to the “legend”/myth of Hades’ deception of Persephone that traps her in the underworld, and Ceres’ suffering. It goes on to describe a little of the narrator’s childhood. At the beginning, Boland writes, “As a child in exile in a city of fogs and strange consonants…” This indicates that the writer was once ‘Persephone’, stuck in England (symbolizing the underworld), the city that symbolizes deprivation of the Irish culture. It then goes on to cut to the narrator’s adult years – as a mother. The poem is essentially about the loss of innocence and the loss of culture, more specifically, Irish culture.
    It gets interesting when the narrator moves into her adult stages, when she describes observing her daughter’s changes. Like what happened to her, her daughter is growing up, straight into the “teenage subculture” (credits to Karen for the phrase :p) world, without knowing what’s right, or what’s out there. This is exemplified by the daughter’s sleeping around “teenage magazines” and coke. These things represent the globalized nature of the world, and how they threaten to destroy culture.
    The narrator’s main conflict revolves around the action she would take to save her daughter from the world. She’s debating whether to shelter her daughter from the world, or to let her experience life for herself. If she did, thus effectively “deferring the gift”, she would “diminish the gift”, depriving her daughter of the human experience.

    “It’s a Woman’s World” also struck me as a very interesting storyline. though it is much less accessible than “The Pomegranate”. It tells you a lot about be role of women in society, and one gives the women enough credit for what they do, and will always view them as a gender meant just for the household. And no one changes anything, even when the women protest.
    “But appearances reassure…” Even when women seem to be trying to gain credit, they really aren’t. They aren’t committed to the cause of empowering women.
    I was expecting a poem that was very feminist. To an extent, it was. It talks about women practically being the backbone of society, propping up the world while the men are off in conflict. But it really didn’t seem that way at the end. It sees as though narrator is critiquing the female public for always agreeing and conforming to expectations. For instance, “… we milestone our lives with oversights I think that the writer is teling women everywhere that we have to fight for it, or it will just be crushed by the expectations set by society – expectations that have not changed over the years. It’s interesting how the actions associated with women – loaf left by the cash register, etc – are domestic chores, chores only for women who are at home.

  7. Jesslyn

    Upon the return of our brains into English poetry right after the hectic 7-day long exams, we have been welcomed by Evan Boland’s nurturing yet passionate “It’s a Woman’s World.” I have identified it to be specifically nurturing yet passionate for quite solid reasons; that of which that was of personal interpretation. I see it to be nurturing – because of the ambience of the whole poem that speaks of women and mothers, who are always portrayed to be a warm and sheltering figure for both their children as well as their husbands. Yet at the same time, I was able to see that the poem was at the same time passionate; enticing the readers to see the fire of women being of “equal rights” that is fueled by Boland.
    When Boland writes,
    “Maybe flame
    burns more greedily
    and wheels are steadier,
    but we’re the same:”
    At first during class, I had previously mentioned that the flame that Boland speaks of could have been a tool used to represent the passion that women should fight for, whatever it is. However, as I read the poem a few more times, I had realized that it had projected something else to me. I would say that the flame was used as Boland to represent men, where although flame would be of bigger impact and was able to take down more things in its way (which was useful because of the work that they have to do in order to feed their families), however it was also easier to demolish. That of which meaning that it may be of bigger impact and heat, yet it is unstable, letting the smallest of variables affect its strength. While wheels, that I think is to represent women was seen to be a more steady or stable figure. This would be used to identify women, especially because as mentioned before that they are more often seen to be a figure that is of shelter and warmth, without the risk factor of having to work as hard as men to provide for the family. What they provide for the family can be said to be love, while men provide the material and more tangible things. However, as Boland states the difference between both genders and responsibilities, he concludes the stanza by saying that “we’re the same”, meaning women and men are actually equal.
    Throughout the years, it has been a controversial issue where women are constantly looked down upon, because they are seen to be creatures of inferiority. Not given rights, a voice, abused, along with other things, they have always been on the negative side of things. However, it has also been a recurring movement. What is meant would be the feminist movement: having been started by numerous public figures dated from all the way back then, there has been a lot of persistence and attempts that have continued to struggle to create an equal stance for both men and women. Although the way women are now treated is at a massive contrast to the way it used to be, there are still certain parts of the world that have yet to see the light. Places mostly in the Middle East, have continued to treat women as submissive property – something that is actually devastating to witness in a world so advanced and modern.
    The poem then continues on talking about the ongoing progresses of women through times – things we have missed as well as should be glad to not be apart of because of our “inferiority”. It then ends with the phrase saying,
    “she’s no fire-eater,
    just my frosty neighbor
    coming home.”
    Referring to what I would say to be the previously used symbol; the wheel, I would say that this ending stanza refers to the effort as well as passion that women must constantly put in if they were at the interest of achieving or maintaining equality. Without constant effort and hard work, they would then end up just like the “frosty neighbor”; trapped in a traditional and restricting society with women always being the inferior beings. I have severely enjoyed analyzing this particular poem, being of somewhat a feminist, I would say that there are still quite a number of messages as well as values that can be cherished from this poem that have yet to be excessively explored. But for now, I would have to be satisfied with what I have discovered so far. I look forward to the upcoming discussions of his other works.

  8. Jason

    Note: Mr. Andrew, I can’t find the fourth blog section, so I’m gonna put my fourth blog here.

    I am on the fence with Eavan Boalnd. Our relationship so far has been like a roller coaster ride with many ups and downs. While I admire her technical pursuits, most of the messages behind her poem were not my cup of tea – the theme of love and whatnot. But I do love her feminist approach in some of her poems and how some of these poems addresses today’s society. I think that her “What Language Did” is an epitome of our volatile relationship.

    First of all, she creates a common ground between the readers and herself by using a simplistic setting of a suburban background. Unfortunately, this method was not a universal method as some readers like myself live in a busy metropolis. Thus, as someone who lives in Jakarta, I was not able to identify myself with the first few opening stanzas when she talked about “roof-tops and houses” or the mundane livelihood of the suburbia. However, I tried to keep an open mind and the first thing that came to my mind was Wisteria Lane (the suburban road in Desperate Housewives). Thus, I tried to imagine myself living in that setting.

    The flowers were particularly interesting for me. The way she described the flowers and its slow decay. As an intermission, let me just say that her transition from an imaginary driven first few stanzas to a more personal ones was impeccable. Anyway, I think that the flowers are representation of the first foreshadowing of the concept of old age in the poem as a whole. She relies on this imagery to emphasize the youth she feels while she’s outside her house and to demonstrate how she’s getting older. Keeping that Wisteria Lane mindset, I could relate to her as sometimes the characters in Desperate Housewives would step outside their front yard and look at the trees and flowers, and have flashbacks of the past.
    Of course one would have to comment on her use of mythical creatures. Let me just start by saying that I am not a fan of mythology at all, but I think it is clever on her part to create such allegory. Casiopeia for example represents the pain women wrongly suffer due to abusive men, which is like what one of the characters in Desperate Housewives had gone through. Taken literally, the main function of this last example has more to do with youth and beauty, much like the flowers mentioned earlier. I felt it was strange how she relied on mythical individuals to arrive at such a thematic conclusion.

    The way that Boland is able to tie in all of these elements and put forth the final statements in the last two stanzas explains the process of aging in the most depressing way. I don’t know whether this is an ‘emo’ poem or not, but I feel that the poem is trying to say that living life of pain and suffering is necessary in order to be able to learn lessons that can be applied from that experience to better your life and others later lives. This last few parts are quite intriguing and empowering for me as it seemed that Boland is standing up to give a voice for women who cannot speak their pain, resulting in a lesson learned for all in spite of the fact that pain and suffering led to this lesson through unspoken language. I think that her intent is commendable, but I just wished that I could relate with it more without putting myself in Wisteria Lane (although playing a part in Desperate Housewives would be fun).

  9. Jason

    Note: Mr. Andrew, I can’t find the fourth blog section, so I’m *going* put my fourth blog here and ignore my first post. Thank you.

    I am on the fence with Eavan Boalnd. Our relationship so far has been like a roller coaster ride with many ups and downs. While I admire her technical pursuits, most of the messages behind her poem were not my cup of tea – the theme of love and whatnot. But I do love her feminist approach in some of her poems and how some of these poems addresses today’s society. I think that her “What Language Did” is an epitome of our volatile relationship.

    First of all, she creates a common ground between the readers and herself by using a simplistic setting of a suburban background. Unfortunately, this method was not a universal method as some readers like myself live in a busy metropolis. Thus, as someone who lives in Jakarta, I was not able to identify myself with the first few opening stanzas when she talked about “roof-tops and houses” or the mundane livelihood of the suburbia. However, I tried to keep an open mind and the first thing that came to my mind was Wisteria Lane (the suburban road in Desperate Housewives). Thus, I tried to imagine myself living in that setting.

    The flowers were particularly interesting for me. The way she described the flowers and its slow decay. As an intermission, let me just say that her transition from an imaginary driven first few stanzas to a more personal ones was impeccable. Anyway, I think that the flowers are representation of the first foreshadowing of the concept of old age in the poem as a whole. She relies on this imagery to emphasize the youth she feels while she’s outside her house and to demonstrate how she’s getting older. Keeping that Wisteria Lane mindset, I could relate to her as sometimes the characters in Desperate Housewives would step outside their front yard and look at the trees and flowers, and have flashbacks of the past.

    Of course one would have to comment on her use of mythical creatures. Let me just start by saying that I am not a fan of mythology at all, but I think it is clever on her part to create such allegory. Casiopeia for example represents the pain women wrongly suffer due to abusive men, which is like what one of the characters in Desperate Housewives had gone through. Taken literally, the main function of this last example has more to do with youth and beauty, much like the flowers mentioned earlier. I felt it was strange how she relied on mythical individuals to arrive at such a thematic conclusion.

    The way that Boland is able to tie in all of these elements and put forth the final statements in the last two stanzas explains the process of aging in the most depressing way. I don’t know whether this is an ‘emo’ poem or not, but I feel that the poem is trying to say that living life of pain and suffering is necessary in order to be able to learn lessons that can be applied from that experience to better your life and others later lives. This last few parts are quite intriguing and empowering for me as it seemed that Boland is standing up to give a voice for women who cannot speak their pain, resulting in a lesson learned for all in spite of the fact that pain and suffering led to this lesson through unspoken language. I think that her intent is commendable, but I just wished that I could relate with it more without having to go through all the hassle and imagine myself in Wisteria Lane (although playing a part in Desperate Housewives would be fun).

  10. Caroline

    After the grueling exams, I was happy to study poems that I found I could understand more easily than some of Boland’s other poems, one of them is “The Pomegranate”.

    “The Pomegranate” uses the myth of Persephone as a metaphor for a mother losing her daughter to teen culture. This usage of the myth (Boland calls it a legend, suggesting it is not fiction) reminds me of the theory that fairy tales have lasting appeal because they contain values that hold true through different cultures and time periods.

    This theory seems to hold true for Boland as she explains how the Persephone myth personally applies to her and how.

    Boland explains that she was Persephone, in London with its fog and an accent foreign to her. London is equated with Hades, being a dark and peculiar place. She later becomes Ceres when she has her own daughter, realizing that her daughter will eventually become Persephone. The can of coke may be the equivalent of the pomegranate Persephone eats as coke is usually associated with teenagers.

    Boland recognizes that the cycle will go on, her daughter will become Ceres, and too, lose her Persephone: “the legend will be hers as well as mine”. Each woman will enter as Persephone and come out as Ceres.

    What I like about this poem is that it is not a usual parallel between a work of literature and a previous work of literature. Most other literature of this type simply draw parallels between its own story and the story being drawn upon. “Pomegranate” explores not only the parallelisms, but also the nature of the myth and the nature of the poem and myth’s relationship.

  11. Michael S

    It’s a Woman’s World is a poetic commentary about the life and role of women in society in history as a whole. The introductory stanza is about how the Women’s role in history has barely changed, citing that ever since the wheel wetted the knife, life for women has ever been the same.

    Boland goes to mention that the accomplishments of Women often pertain to household duties such as cutting loafs of bread and washing clothes, and she is much grieved by the fact. She believes that it is far too minuscule of an accomplishment to truly define the glory of a woman’s life.

    Boland mourns the fact that women will never become “star gazers” and “fire eaters” which are the passionate and ambitious women who are to revolutionize the role of women of society. The burning passion of this movement relates to the fire eater description, and the star gazers are the people who dream of such things.

    Boland goes to mention that women have not expressed their due anger to their situations and roles in society:
    “And still no page
    scores the low music
    of our outrage.”
    She criticizes that there is no major reaction to the standards of women set upon society.

    In the end, Boland mentions that her female neighbors are no “fire eaters” but are instead “frosty”, stating that their passions for women’s rights are ambivalent.

  12. tiffany

    I actually quite like Boland’s ‘It’s a Woman’s World’ because as a female I like the irony Boland starkly presents in this poem. The title suggests that the poem is pro-woman or even rather feminist, but the contents of the poem itself suggests otherwise. Even so, it encourages women to embrace their strengths. The fire imagery exemplified in the flame that burns greedily and the fire-eaters symbolize the passion for equality within women and their potential power. Therefore, the lines, “our windows moth our children to the flame of hearth not history,” portrays the strength and power of women since they are the ones that their children run to in need of refuge. Consequently, it is implied that women have an eternal flame for equality and the desire to overcome societal limitations.
    In addition to the flame imagery, there is also symbolism of the wheel. This is demonstrated in the lines, “Our way of life has hardly changed since a wheel first whetted a knife.” The wheel symbolizes all of the aspects within women through its spindles. Consequently, women are mothers, wives, sisters, friends, and so on. Thus, it is the woman acts as the center of the wheel, holding the spindles together. Consequently, it is the woman who keeps the world moving and holds it together.
    Moreover, the urgent tone of the poem exemplified in, “she’s no fire-eater, just my frosty neighbour coming home,” refers to the wheel’s symbolism. Just as the wheel is circular and moves in a continuous cycle, if women do not make efforts to strive for equality, then they will also be like the frosty neighbor. Accordingly, if women do not strive for influence and equality, then they will find themselves trapped in a traditional and restricting society.

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