Blog Posts #2 – 3

Excellent thoughts on the last blog post! I enjoyed reading all of them. Now time for the next. Don’t miss it! Remember I need a total of five (5); 2 or 3 should be an oral response, I believe.

Later!

Advertisements

26 Comments

Filed under Novel: Wuthering Heights

26 responses to “Blog Posts #2 – 3

  1. Jason

    Dark, menacing and brooding are three words that I think would easily sum up Heathcliff’s menacing, yet endearing character. In the last few chapters, certain character developments were observed. Heathcliff for example, was seen as a nefarious human being. His treatment of Hindley as well as his abuse towards Isabella had evidently exhibited his malice. However, I think it was hard for the readers, at least for me, not to sympathize with Heathcliff for I know what was the root of his evil doing. Indeed such actions stemmed from his deep love for Catherine, her betrayal, and the ill treatment he received from Hindley and the Linton family that ultimately ignited his desire to devise a plan for revenge. I think that these actions were able to ‘justify’ Heathcliff’s new disposition as a villain. Yet again, it is difficult for us to determine whether Heathcliff was a hero or a villain, for he indeed had gone through a lot of hardships that mold him into this wicked human being. He behaves cruelly out of the pain of his love for Catherine, which I think caused the reader to sympathize towards Heathcliff’s misery as to the misery he causes in others. There is no point in the story, no matter how wicked he acted, seemed to make him become entirely inhuman or incomprehensible as the readers were lured by Heathcliff’s misery.
    Much of his new immoral characteristics were caused by his dysfunctional relationship with Catherine, which was one of the most interesting aspects of the story for it raises numerous questions. It indeed begs the question who was at fault: Heathcliff, Hindley, Catherine or even the society of that time. Was it Catherine’s lust for wealth and glamorous live or was it Heathcliff’s class status? Whatever it is, I would say that their relationship does not work as a result from the expectation of society at that time. Much emphasis was placed on the importance of belonging to a rich, upper class society, and this, I believe contributed to their failing relationship. Indeed much emphasis was placed on morale. This again begs the question of Emily Brontë main purpose: was she trying to warn us against the danger of deep love or was she advocating it for it seemed that the innocent Isabella had fell victim to Heathcliff’s ill treatment and had been under the radar for the most part of the book.
    In light of relationship, another interesting aspect was Nelly. Indeed, throughout these few chapters that we read, we can see that Nelly had exhibited certain biases when she criticizes Catherine’s behavior in a somewhat envious tone calling her arrogant and selfish. This again begs the question whether or not she was attracted to one of Catherine’s lover? Perhaps Edgar, as she often praises him throughout the novel, or even Heathcliff for later Catherine teased him of seeing Nelly ‘checking him out’. Indeed, the convoluted relationship triangle or even hexagon had attributed to the mystery and twisted past of Wuthering Heights. These indeed aroused my interest to continue reading the book further.
    On a side note, while we were discussing about the different ways to interpret the novel, one interpretation had particularly interest me: the Freudian interpretations. Although we had only superficially glanced over the theory and it would be hard to use direct terms to interpret the story, I would like to attempt it. Indeed, looking at the story with Freud’s psychoanalysis theory, I think that there is a parallelism between Catherine, Heathcliff and Edgar’s characteristics in relationship to Freud’s id, ego and superego. I think that rather than approaching it per character, it should be looked at as a whole. Heathcliff for example is the id, the primitive drives, as he seeks pleasure, and hates pain – in this case the pain he received from Catherine’s betrayal. It is important to take note that id doesn’t take into consideration the time and would remain unconscious; consequently, Heathcliff’s dark skin origin was unknown and his whereabouts before coming back to Wuthering Heights had became an enigma. The ego on the other hand can be represented through Catherine, who related to the importance of society. She tests the impulses of the id against reality and control the energetic id until it had its desires fulfilled. Lastly, I think that Edgar represent the super ego as he is considered to be the embodiment of proper behavior and morality thought be society. As a result Catherine, had to choose between Heathcliff and Edgar, just like human choosing between submitting to their id or following the super ego. This is just one interpretation of Freud’s psychoanalysis. I think that there are many other ways in which different characters would represent the different levels of Freud’s psychoanalysis theory.

  2. Stacy :)

    This week in class we discussed how Marxists may view and critique Wuthering Heights. A few thoughts: Chapter 6 of Wuthering Heights pinpoints the clear distinction between classes. A few instances highlight the discrimination of the higher class towards the lower class. For example, the beginning of the chapter highlights how Mr. Hindley’s wife had no money, thus the neighbors gossip about her endlessly. Although she had no wrongs towards the community, they jump to judge her because of her lack of wealth and no ‘name’. Thus, the first impression the neighbors gave to her was negative and demeaning judgment. On the other hand, we also see that she has racial advantage. Since she is white, she is not discriminated and demeaned as terribly as Heathcliff.
    In addition to this, we also see how the Lintons became judgmental of Catherine and Heathcliff when they were ‘spying’ on the Thrusschross Grange. Mr. Linton could not believe that his dog found Catherine Earnshaw because of the company she kept. He found it perturbing that Catherine was friends with a gypsy. The old lady in the Linton house also called Heathcliff a wicked boy, and that he was unfit for the house. This is class differentiation to an extreme – the Lintons were somewhat racist and classist against Heathcliff. Thus, for this reason, they did not invite him into the house. There is a clear class discrimination highlighted in this chapter. Later on in the book, many instances project the clear distinctions between classes amongst the characters. When Catherine comes back after spending a few weeks with the Lintons, she becomes more aware of the social stature she must continue to possess. It is as if she becomes a whole new person, using dresses and acting ‘appropriately’. However, when she is with Heathcliff, she reflects her true colors. In truth, the new lady she becomes still fails to suppress her inner wildness. It is clear that Catherine is a woman of passion. She is anything but passive.
    Also, another clear distinction between classes is the way the Earnshaws treat Nelly. Although she was also was brought up with the rest of the Earnshaws, she is treated as the servant. With respect to Nelly, she can probably sense that she is treated differently. However, because they were raised together, she feels she has the right to advise, scold them. She is almost a motherly figure. Hindley and Catherine, however, treats her as someone of the lower class. There is a servant-master relationship between Nelly and Hindley/Catherine, but also a growing friendship. This is evident in the conversation that takes place between Catherine and Nelly. Catherine tells Nelly of Edgar’s proposal, and expressed the inner struggle she is facing. Although Catherine realizes that she is irrevocably in love with Heathcliff, she admits to Nelly that she loves Edgar because of his ‘kindness’, but mostly because of the social position he holds. Edgar is the symbol of a perfect country gentleman, one who is not so impulsive, and is extremely civil. The only factor he passionate hates is Heathcliff due to the way he makes Catherine act. Although Edgar and the Lintons could momentarily suppress Catherine’s wildness, Catherine quickly realizes that she is not the ‘passive country wife’ type. It becomes increasingly evident that one of the main reasons Catherine decided to marry Edgar is because of his wealth and his noble reputation. The love between Catherine and Heathcliff is clearly present, but there is a constant battle between the desire for passionate love or high social stature in Catherine’s mind. This pinpoints how superficial and shallow Catherine truly is. She is mentally unstable, and acts much too impulsively. It’s so obvious that her heart truly lies with Heathcliff, but because she must uphold her ego, she constantly tries to cover these feelings up with her emotions for Edgar. However, she is very transparent and honest about these feelings with Nelly, which shows the trust that has been developed between the two characters.

  3. Sheri

    “I was almost always at Wuthering Heights; because my mother had nursed Mr. Hindley Earnshaw … and I got used to playing with the children: I ran errands too, and helped to make hay, and hung about the farm ready for anything that anybody would set me to.”

    As readers, we see the story of Wuthering Heights unfold through the eyes of Nelly Dean, our knowledgeable yet unreliable narrator. As housekeeper of Thrushcross Grange, and someone whose presence has been felt by our main characters since their youth, Nelly is able to provide a comprehensive point of view unlike any other.
    There is not much we know about Nelly, as her primary role in the story is to narrate its events. We are able to gather some pieces of information about her from a few snippets of text, such as the one I have included above. However, the bulk of our knowledge regarding Nelly is gained from observing how she views other characters, and how they in turn treat her. Though she is a servant, most characters do not treat her as such. Lockwood, for example, refers to her as Mrs. Dean — a sign of respect. Moreover, she is trusted by the Earnshaws, although they may experience conflicts with her from time to time.
    Catherine, in particular, is frequently at odds with Nelly. Their relationship is an interesting one, and one of the key points supporting the argument that Nelly is an unreliable narrator. Though she looks upon the characters with a critical eye, Nelly seems to save the majority of her criticism for Catherine. Conversely, Catherine trusts Nelly completely. Her actions even indicate that she might have, in a way, even loved Nelly. After all, it is Nelly in whom Catherine confides, and it is Nelly who Catherine insists on bringing with her to Thrushcross Grange. Most of all, it is Nelly to whom Catherine utters her famous “I am Heathcliff” line.
    It is interesting to note how one character can treat the other with such evident dislike, while the latter regards the former as a friend and a confidant. While I myself regard Catherine as one who is undeserving of sympathy — much like the other characters in the story — Nelly’s treatment of her encourages me to look upon Catherine with a little more pity. I felt this sentiment the most in the moments shortly before Catherine’s death, when Nelly betrays her secrets to Edgar.
    However, as much as she seems to despise Catherine, Nelly is overcome with emotion upon the former’s death. Perhaps she had genuine love for Catherine, but harbored resentments that she was never able to overcome. In my opinion, this arose from the fact that both Catherine and Nelly were raised as family, but later rose to different heights. While Catherine marries Edgar Linton and becomes part of high class society, Nelly remains a servant.
    There is also one school of thought that Nelly is the true villain of Wuthering Heights. Her treatment of Catherine lends credibility to this opinion. More and more, I am coming to realize that Nelly does indeed instigate many of the events in the story. The question now is her motive: did she merely do it for her own cruel entertainment, or was there a deeper reason involved?

  4. Jason

    Dark, menacing and brooding are three words that I think would easily sum up Heathcliff’s menacing, yet endearing character. In the last few chapters, certain character developments were observed. Heathcliff for example, was seen as a nefarious human being. His treatment of Hindley as well as his abuse towards Isabella had evidently exhibited his malice. However, I think it was hard for the readers, at least for me, not to sympathize with Heathcliff for I know what was the root of his evil doing. Indeed such actions stemmed from his deep love for Catherine, her betrayal, and the ill treatment he received from Hindley and the Linton family that ultimately ignited his desire to devise a plan for revenge. I think that these actions were able to ‘justify’ Heathcliff’s new disposition as a villain. Yet again, it is difficult for us to determine whether Heathcliff was a hero or a villain, for he indeed had gone through a lot of hardships that mold him into this wicked human being. He behaves cruelly out of the pain of his love for Catherine, which I think caused the reader to sympathize towards Heathcliff’s misery as to the misery he causes in others. There is no point in the story, no matter how wicked he acted, seemed to make him become entirely inhuman or incomprehensible as the readers were lured by Heathcliff’s misery.

    Much of his new immoral characteristics were caused by his dysfunctional relationship with Catherine, which was one of the most interesting aspects of the story for it raises numerous questions. It indeed begs the question who was at fault: Heathcliff, Hindley, Catherine or even the society of that time. Was it Catherine’s lust for wealth and glamorous live or was it Heathcliff’s class status? Whatever it is, I would say that their relationship does not work as a result from the expectation of society at that time. Much emphasis was placed on the importance of belonging to a rich, upper class society, and this, I believe contributed to their failing relationship. Indeed much emphasis was placed on morale. This again begs the question of Emily Brontë main purpose: was she trying to warn us against the danger of deep love or was she advocating it for it seemed that the innocent Isabella had fell victim to Heathcliff’s ill treatment and had been under the radar for the most part of the book.

    In light of relationship, another interesting aspect was Nelly. Indeed, throughout these few chapters that we read, we can see that Nelly had exhibited certain biases when she criticizes Catherine’s behavior in a somewhat envious tone calling her arrogant and selfish. This again begs the question whether or not she was attracted to one of Catherine’s lover? Perhaps Edgar, as she often praises him throughout the novel, or even Heathcliff for later Catherine teased him of seeing Nelly ‘checking him out’. Indeed, the convoluted relationship triangle or even hexagon had attributed to the mystery and twisted past of Wuthering Heights. These indeed aroused my interest to continue reading the book further.

    On a side note, while we were discussing about the different ways to interpret the novel, one interpretation had particularly interest me: the Freudian interpretations. Although we had only superficially glanced over the theory and it would be hard to use direct terms to interpret the story, I would like to attempt it. Indeed, looking at the story with Freud’s psychoanalysis theory, I think that there is a parallelism between Catherine, Heathcliff and Edgar’s characteristics in relationship to Freud’s id, ego and superego. I think that rather than approaching it per character, it should be looked at as a whole. Heathcliff for example is the id, the primitive drives, as he seeks pleasure, and avoids pain. It is important to take note that id doesn’t take into consideration the time and would remain unconscious; consequently, Heathcliff’s dark skin origin was unknown and his whereabouts before coming back to Wuthering Heights had became an enigma. The ego on the other hand is represented through Catherine, who is related to the importance of society. She tests the impulses of the id against reality and control it until it had its desires fulfilled. Lastly, I think that Edgar represent the super ego as he is considered to be the embodiment of proper behavior and morality thought be society. As a result Catherine, had to choose between Heathcliff and Edgar, just like human choosing between submitting to their id or following the super ego. This is just one interpretation of Freud’s psychoanalysis. I think that there are many other ways in which different characters would represent the different levels of Freud’s psychoanalysis theory.

  5. Daphne Tan

    This week, we continued reading through Wuthering Heights, and were told to make posters depicting the characters we found interesting. My group consisting of me, Sheri and Jason chose two characters: Nelly and Lockwood. None of us seemed to like them, but still found them very interesting.

    The character of Nelly in itself explains the reason for this book to be socially unacceptable in the Bronte sisters’ time. In other books, the typical character of a young maid almost always has a close relationship with the young miss, but this is the exact opposite in Wuthering Heights. The way I see it, Nelly hated Catherine, and Catherine seemed to return the exact same feelings. Nelly was jealous of Catherine’s, well, everything. Everything from her beauty, her relationship to Heathcliff, her privileged life, to her love interests. Seeing her strong emotions toward the characters in the story, Nelly really isn’t a dependable source to gain information. She overly compliments Edgar Linton and Heathcliff, and didn’t seem to have one good thing to say about Catherine. She did not seem to hesitate to gossip about her master of over 40 years to a tenant who just arrived a few days ago.

    Lockwood is also very hard to like. He sees himself as a gentleman when he really is not. He demands respect as if he didn’t need to earn it. He arrives at the Wuthering Heights knowing fully that he was not wanted there, and demands hospitality from its residents. After being graciously and secretly lead into a room by the house maid, he proceeds to read diaries written by the young ladies of that house, and lie about his actions a few pages later. He then breaks the room’s glass window because “a branch was annoying him”, and curses and accuses the generous actions of the house maid for leading him into a “haunted room” when found out by Heathcliff. If that wasn’t enough, he then stuck his nose where it doesn’t belong and asked to be told the story of the residents in Wuthering Heights.

    All in all, I really, really do not like the two characters, but I still can’t seem to stop reading about their horrible actions because it is very realistic. I think the people of the Bronte sisters’ time did not seem to like the story because it depicts truth. I think the character of Lockwood is a generalization of the worldview and beliefs of the people of that time. Emily wrote all of Lockwood’s thoughts as if it was really his diary. She wrote both the good things and the bad, even though the latter seemed to drown the former.

  6. Hartini

    English Blog 2 – Andrew Kuiper

    Marxist View of Wuthering Heights
    One of the first things we explored this week was the different ways to interpret works of literature. Wading through the multitude of ways to interpret a text (Marxist, feminist, queer, homoerotic subtext, etc.), we settled at trying to craft an interpretation of Wuthering Heights through Marxist eyes. The Marxist interpreter looks out for themes pertaining to class, dictatorship, the revolution of the working class.
    At first glance, Wuthering Heights was just another love story to me. However, upon further inspection, it is evident that the recurring show of disparity between the classes in the text allows for Wuthering Heights to be seen as a form of social commentary about the relationship between the rich and poor.
    Wuthering Heights is intriguing because of the ever-changing class distinction of the characters. Generally, for that time period, the class you were born into is a class you stay in. Evidently, this was not the case in WH.
    Heathcliff immediately comes to mind when one thinks of the social issues in Wuthering Heights. Heathcliff is truly an interesting character. He represents not only one- but two different social classes in the text. At first, he appears as the lower, repressed class. Perceived as a rude gypsy with no noble attributes whatsoever, he is subject to persecution and alienation from the higher class (though not Catherine). No one actually even knows where he came from, but they immediately assume that he is of lower status, even though Mr. Earnshaw wanted him to have equal footing with the rest of the family. After Mr. Earnshaw’s death, Heathcliff is pushed even lower in status. He is seen as a lowly character, somewhat like a servant. Hindley even blames his father for being too kind to Heathcliff, saying that he will reduce Heathcliff to his rightful place. This is a clear representation of the class struggle in the story. Throughout all this, Catherine, of a higher class, still maintains a close relationship with him. Catherine and Heathcliff’s relationship before Catherine’s stay at the Lintons is something removed from the inequalities of the real world.
    After Catherine’s stay at the Lintons, she comes back as someone who has embraced her “higher class” more fully. She becomes the bridge between Heathcliff and the higher class, even though she sometimes makes it apparent that she recognizes their social differences, and that it does become a problem in their relationship. This is especially apparent when she is contemplating Edgar’s proposal. She loves Heathcliff, but simply cannot look past his lower, “degraded” state. This regrettably shows that even the deepest relationships can be hurt by the existence of class distinctions and social discrimination.
    Heathcliff’s return after his absence changes the class distinctions in the story. After a series of events, through which he gains even more land and money, he takes on the role of the higher class- the dictator- going against the Marxist idea of having classless society after the proletarian revolution. He takes the role of the capitalist class, which in Marxist eyes, isn’t how he should have turned out after going up against the higher (“bourgeoisie”) class.
    Though this was only a very brief look at WH as a socio-economic centered book, I look forward to using different views to interpret the text – feminism, more precisely.

  7. Amelia

    The inequality between the social classes in the English society during the middle throughout the end of the nineteenth century was highlighted from the beginning of the story. The fact that Emily Bronte wrote so casually about the family’s initial reaction and harsh treatment towards Heathcliff probably meant that this kind of treatment was considered to be the norm. Viewers with a Marxist point of view would agree with the social customs portrayed in this book. There are several Marxist ideas that can be found in this book, aside from putting value in others based on their heritage. Heathcliff, although initially was being roughly treated by Hindley, Cathy, and even Nelly, had been able to find protection from Mr. Earnshaw, who would be the one to reprimand his own children. However, after Mr. Earnshaw died, Heathcliff was forced to be a servant by Hindley. Hindley, by doing this, was determined to reduce Heathcliff to his right place and setting him in a social standing determinedly lower than he. This represents the class struggle between Hindley and Heathcliff. This was not solely because Hindley was harboring bitterness and jealousy over his own father’s love for Heathcliff, since Catherine felt the same way. When asked by Nelly what her reasons for marrying Edgar were, Catherine stated reasons that were purely materialistic, even though one could see that Catherine did not feel the same sense of connection with Edgar as she did with Heathcliff. Catherine had even said herself that it “would degrade [her] to marry Heathcliff, so he shall never know how [she] loves him.” Catherine had also said that marrying Edgar would make her “the greatest woman of the neighborhood.” Catherine had then also told Nelly that she would use Edgar’s money to “aid Heathcliff to rise.” This is yet another manifestation of a Marxist theory that someone of a higher standing would utilise her powers to raise someone of lower status to equality.
    The class struggle could be seen clearly until the end of the book. When Heathcliff married Isabella for the money, and how towards the end of the book, after Heathcliff came back a rich and powerful man, though still as desolate as ever, if not more, and how he reversed the roles and made Hareton, Hindley’s son, the servant of the house, Heathcliff had fulfilled what a Marxist would consider a revolutionary and overthrew the gentry.

  8. Nick

    As I was reading chapter 6 again, when Catherine stayed in Thrushcross Grange and Heathcliff was sent home back to Wuthering Heights, I wondered to myself, did Catherine actually care about Heathcliff? It seemed as though after she was being pampered by the Linton household, she forgot all about Heathcliff. If she really was as savage as Nelly described her, then why did she stay? I would have thought that if she really cared about Heathcliff, she’d rather be with him than be with the Lintons. I can see why Heathcliff was so upset and angry afterwards when she came back. It could very possibly be that she loved the attention Heathcliff gave her, and not him himself. She seemed very content at Thrushcross Grange even though Heathcliff wasn’t there because she was getting attention from someone else. I think that even thoughCatherine behaved in a fashion that was deemed rude and savage, her “high-status” made her have a natural affinity towards the lifestyle of someone who acts in a very civilised and proper manner. That is possibly why she forgot all about Heathcliff. Or, she could have only behaved badly just to get the attention of Heathcliff. Now that someone else is giving her attention, she forgets about Heathcliff. It is also interesting to see how the Lintons’ perception of Catherine differed from Heathcliff. They all assumed they were up to no good, but after they realized Catherine was an Earnshaw, all the blame went straight to the kid that looked like a gypsy. All the blame, just because he was a gypsy. Even though Catherine also decided to snoop around the Lintons’ residence, they pampered her. I find that very selfish of Catherine, how she could just let her best friend take all the blame and she be rewarded for doing the same thing.

  9. Ainslie

    This week in English class we read chapters 6-10 from Wuthering Heights. In Chapter 6, the Linton family is shown to be much more ‘civilized’ than the Earnshaws, or at least Catherine and Heathcliff, are. They are more of what I would expect a family from the Victorian era to be like. When Heathcliff and Catherine are spying on them, they find them to be different from themselves, in terms of what they would consider to be fun. I think of the Lintons as narrow-minded and more ‘snobby’, since they immediately show disdain towards Heathcliff simply because of his appearance, whereas Mr. Earnshaw picked him up from the streets after just meeting him. They then refuse to allow him to stay with Catherine, and Isabella mentions that he looks “exactly like the son of the fortune-teller that stole my tame pheasant” and wants Mr. Linton to lock him up. This sort of helped me understand why the Lintons are prejudiced towards gypsies or at least those who look like they might be gypsies, although I thought that this reaction to Heathcliff was interesting and somewhat ironic because Isabella falls in love with Heathcliff much later. They aren’t completely wrong in disliking Heathcliff, and he doesn’t make much of a good impression either by swearing in front of them. Over the next few chapters Catherine irritates me as her behavior is so different after coming back from Thrushcross Grange, and she does not interact with Heathcliff as much anymore. She enjoys the company of the Lintons, who she formerly despised when she was spying on Thrushcross Grange with Heathcliff, and so it seems like she’s become what she hates. Then, she begins to get more closer to Edgar, until he proposes to her, and she agrees. I don’t know why she felt the need to give an answer immediately, or why she even thought of saying yes. Catherine decided to choose wealth and status with Edgar over happiness with Heathcliff. I initially thought maybe these were more contextual things, as in more normal during the Victorian era, but even now some people might still choose wealth over happiness. No matter how much you say money can’t buy happiness, some people don’t seem to get the message. And that’s a lesson that Catherine learns, and probably has to live through.

  10. Patricia

    Sometimes, the most awesome moment when you’re learning something was when you get to make connections. I am especially surprised how in this case, there are actually links between the chapters I read in Wuthering Heights with my TOK presentation. This previous week in my TOK presentation, my group mates and I had presented on how people have different perceptions of right and wrong, and how logic and emotion plays a key role in determining what is right or wrong despite what our worldviews are. In my perception, logic contributes in allowing the individual to come up with valid and acceptable reasons in determining what is right or wrong. On the other hand, emotion contributes in determining what is right or wrong depending on what we value most. I found it rather interesting and somewhat surprising, how the characters in Wuthering Heights are somewhat extreme. It seems, that up to this point the only people that seem to have a similar views to us on what is right and wrong was basically Nelly and Mr. Lockwood. Within the story, we would often hear how Nelly disapproves the violent behaviors of the Earnshaws including Heathcliff, and how Mr. Lockwood considers their behaviors rather foreign and rude. What I do not fully grasp was the fact that Catherine, Heathcliff, Hindley, and later the grown-up Hareton, could have such a contrasting perception on right and wrong. They seem to embrace the bad behaviors of swearing, cursing, and physically hurting other human beings. It seems as if by embracing such bad behaviors, they had pretty much lost their conscience. How do they know what is wrong? Do they not have emotion that let’s them feel that what they do is right or wrong? Or can they logically defend their actions as morally right? Marxism could have played a role in influencing their views on the class differences and that the Earnshaws and Lintons are ‘superior’ to Heathcliff and other working classes. But, could one maintain a close relationship with another individual and at the same time able to hurt and look down on them without any emotional effects? Catherine grew up together with Nelly, yet she could still bear hurting her physically. This leads to my final question, if Catherine’s views were influenced by her views on the distinction between classes, and that it reflects how the people view things during the Victorian era; in what ways did the people living in the Victorian Era determine what is right and wrong?

  11. Jesslyn

    So far this week in the ever enchanting Wuthering Heights, our class had gone through chapters 6-10 in the story of Catherine and Heathcliff. The story so far has developed quite rapidly, especially in terms of the Catherine and Heathcliff’s twisted relationship. I personally as a reader, although utterly infuriated with Catherine’s constant change in behavior towards Heathcliff in the presence of other characters, was in fact completely touched with Catherine’s confession to Nelly of her undying and unconditional love for Heathcliff that she indeed has yet contains inside of her. The unfortunate circumstance of the society during the time is the sole reason to which Catherine had acted the way that they did, the reason that she chose Edgar over Heathcliff, and the reason that she acts differently towards Heathcliff when the Lintons are present. Catherine, although irrevocably in love with Heathcliff had chosen Edgar, the supposedly “better choice” due to his wealth, looks, and background. Catherine’s choice was clearly driven by her desire of having a “bright” future that was supposedly guaranteed by life with the Lintons because of the higher social status that they stood on. Although back during those times Catherine’s behavior might have been understood and in a way normal, I personally would strongly like to beg to differ. I think that despite all the positive and materialistic things that the Lintons and Edgar had in store for Catherine, I think that Catherine really should have followed her heart. Even if that meant adjusting to Heathcliff’s “lower” lifestyle, even if that means that she would be looked upon differently by the rest of the society. Because as much as most of us would like to be able to control who we fall in love with – we really are not able to. This applies to Catherine as well, whereas her love for Heathcliff was overbearing yet she still chose to be with Edgar, in hopes that slowly she would be able to help Heathcliff as well through her higher social status. Edgar, although a perfect gentlemen is still no Heathcliff, which is where Catherine’s heart really lies. I think that the character Nelly in the story is meant to be the voice of the readers, meaning her constant questioning as well as edge is meant to represent the readers and their obvious questions to the hugely quizzical acts of Catherine as well as Heathcliff towards the story. I really look forward to the upcoming chapters of the story, especially after the unleashing of Catherine’s true feelings for Heathcliff was exposed in the last chapter.

  12. Jason

    Polar opposite. These are the two words that I think could easily sum up the relationship between Catherine and Isabella. They have contrasting background, desires and needs. I for one believed that Isabella to an extent could easily be a foil to Catherine’s character. Although character descriptions in the story are questionable knowing Nelly’s possible bias, these are the attributes that we are given and such attributes easily show contrast between the two. On the one side we have Catherine, a self-absorbed, tenacious and strong-will. She is consumed by pride and greed, as seen from the reason to why she wants to marry Edgar. Occasionally, we could see her temper tantrums and ill treatment towards the people around her including Nelly. Indeed, Catherine’s ‘aggressive’ nature could easily contrast Isabella’s gentle nature, and to an extent naivety. Isabella represents culture and civilization, as seen in her refinement and in her weakness. Her high society background could easily be the reason why she acted this way. While Catherine marry Edgar to improve her social status, we could see Isabella “has a capacity for strong attachments”. Her naivety was taken as an advantage by Heathcliff, who then brought her into a tormenting marriage. Clearly both women’s parallel positions enable us, the reader to see their differences within greater clarity.

    However, even though that is the case, and even though we might some times hate Catherine’s egoistic disposition, I have this slight pity towards her and I had this impulse of somewhat rooting for her. I personally think that on top of the façade she put, there is a sense of confusion and despair and she is trying to balance between power and love. Maybe it’s because of her ‘feministic’ stance and her willingness to stand up what she believed in that made me empathize with her. She was not scared of Edgar or Heathcliff, and she somewhat defies the norm by going against what is expected of a lady back then – to be submissive. On the other hand, we have Isabella who represents that passive and submissive female character.

    Their contrasting characteristics also beg the question on Brontë’s intention and message. Many argued, and I do side with them, that her novel is intended to be dictating, teaching us the readers of the danger of loving someone too deeply. If this is true, then the creation of a charismatic character such as Catherine, defeats its purpose. Contrasting her with Isabella, Isabella is an innocent and to an extent morally pure, she never had that same finesse as Catherine. Therefore, even though Isabella’s suffering could easily show condemnation of obsessive passions, we tend to overlook it. This then begs the question of the extent Brontë want her readers to understand about the perils of an overly intense love.

    On a side note, another aspect that I found interesting was where Catherine was later buried – with Edgar on one side and Heathcliff on the other. She wasn’t buried along with the Earnshaws or the Lintons. I suppose this was just a symbolism that suggests her conflicted loyalties between the two men, or even the two families. She had social ambitions, causing her to marry Edgar; however, she is also motivated by impulses that violate social conventions, which was loving Heathcliff.

  13. Karen

    This is Blog Post Number 3

    We have a tendency to define love as something that is beautiful; something that brings out the best in us. That is why it is so difficult for me to think of Catherine and Heathcliff’s feelings for each other as love, and not as obsession.
    In the crudest sense, Catherine likes hurting people. She seems to thrive through the infliction of pain on others. I would argue that she does this because she needs the reassurance that comes with eliciting reactions from the person on the end of her verbal assaults. Catherine tortures Heathcliff with her words because she wants to see his emotional turbulence. She draws power from the sight of the depth of Heathcliff’s feelings for her, and she does this continually to satisfy her base needs.
    She chooses to marry Edgar instead of Heathcliff not because she wants to help Heathcliff with Edgar’s money, but because she knows that she can afford to. Heathcliff will never stop being obsessed with her, and Edgar is just another admirer – he’s the cherry on top of Heathcliff’s cake.
    Catherine’s greed allows her to love no one but herself. She wants position, wealth, and the infatuation of both Heathcliff and Edgar. She enjoys pitting them against each other, and she enjoys the fact that both are foolish enough to be her playthings. Catherine is a child in a woman’s body. She lacks maturity, and is full of hypocrisy. She believes herself some kind of angelic being, and although she may look like one, her character affirms something else entirely. Her behavior is sick, and it’s twisted. But that is partly what makes Wuthering Heights so fascinating – that such perversity can exist in the quiet English countryside.

  14. Stacy :)

    This week we focused on one particular quote found in Chapter 9:

    “My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods, time will change it, im well aware; as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath; a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff! He’s always, always in my mind; not as a pleasure, any more than I always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being, so don’t talk of our separation against. It is impractical.”

    There were a few things that jumped out to me, such as the possible biblical allusion. When Catherine says “I am Heathcliff!”, it is as if Bronte is referring to the biblical passage in Mark 10:8 (Two will become one) as a connotation towards marriage. In some ways, however, it is also as if Catherine is in love with herself because she constantly tells Nelly how they are so alike (that they are one). Catherine’s love reflects her true nature: she is wild, impulsive and uncontrolled. However, Catherine experiences some sort of perpetuated internal struggle where she tries to pick between real love, and her real identity or social stature and desire for respect. It becomes increasingly evident that Catherine’s love for Edgar was only but a blowing of the wind, the slightest of infatuation as a result for Catherine’s desire for a dignified position in society and her desire for material wealth that Edgar could offer. Catherine also plays the more masculine role in her relationship with Edgar. In this struggle we see the surfacing of the theme of nature vs civilization. Nature is filled with unprecedented surprises, where it can be filled with the most extreme of weather and changes. It is wild, uncontrolled and untamable. In many ways, Catherine’s personality and Catherine’s love for Heathcliff reflects the characteristics of nature. On the other hand, civilization symbolizes the innate nature of the Lintons: they are poise, controlled, and the most stereotyped form of the upper class during the Victorian period. The Lintons are the epitome of the status quo. There are two roaring personalities that constantly battle out.
    Also, it is clear that Heathcliff brings out the passionate side of Catherine. No matter what they do, it is as if nature always brings them back together. Catherine’s death comes as a starting point where Heathcliff seeks vengeance amongst those who have discriminated him. It is clear that without each other, they are untamed and tuck away their conscience.

  15. Sheri

    There are countless fictional pairings known for their (sometimes illogical) devotion. Some that come to mind are Romeo and Juliet from the eponymous Shakespeare play, Rose and Jack from the Titanic film, and even the one-sided relationship between Eponine and Marius from Les Miserables. But of these, few come close in terms of passion to the pair that is Heathcliff and Catherine. Perhaps this larger-than-life relationship is the most critical aspect of the story of Wuthering Heights. Their bond is passionate, consuming, unique, and many would say unhealthy. Nevertheless, I believe it to be the driving force behind the story, and its two main characters as well.
    Since childhood, Heathcliff has always loved Catherine. Their initial meeting left a lot to be desired, but it did not take long after that for them to realize they were kindred spirits, perhaps even two halves of the same soul. The most key aspect of this, in my opinion, is that both appear to personify freedom in a restrictive Victorian society with seemingly countless social rules. Both are rebels during an era when behaving as such could potentially involve a great cost. It is then no surprise that they have an unbreakable bond.
    However, it also comes to no surprise that (as characters who thrive on being dramatic) their relationship is often erratic and melodramatic. This becomes painfully obvious upon their first meeting after several years: Heathcliff had finally returned after an absence of three years, most likely from America, and Catherine had married Edgar Linton. Nelly’s description of the event depicted a worrisome, animalistic scene in which raw emotion overcame logical thought.
    This is a typical in interactions between Heathcliff and Catherine. After all, they see themselves as one and the same. The most famous quote from the book — in which Catherine exclaims, “I am Heathcliff!” — is a testament to this. Heathcliff expresses similar sentiments, often referring to Catherine as his soul. Even Nelly was able to understand this, once mentioning that the worst punishment anyone could bestow upon the two was separating them from one another.
    Their love faces countless obstacles. It is one that will never come to fruition and is unlikely to result in a happy ending. But this is the defining characteristic of their relationship, and perhaps what makes Heathcliff and Catherine so desirable to one another. This dangerous quality combined with their unstable personalities is undeniably a formula for disaster, pain, and angst. It is unfortunate and upsetting that neither get what they want in the end: Catherine dies without ever fulfilling her desire to be with Heathcliff, who is left lonely and miserable for the rest of his life. Their relationship shows (with painful clarity) love’s ability to reveal both the best and the worst in all of us.

  16. Amelia

    Since the beginning, he readers watched as the relationship between Heathcliff and Catherine becoming less and less of a normal affectionate relationship between two people. As the story progresses, it becomes clear that there is the pair will not be able to function together. They are already stepping on the boundaries of insanity existing by themselves, let alone what they would be like when put together. I would argue that the main reason why Catherine was much more better suited with Edgar than Heathcliff is because Edgar’s personality is a polarity to that of Catherine’s, and everything about Catherine is very much toward the verge of extremity. Catherine was prone to frequent emotional outbursts, and Edgar was the person who would balance her out evenly. Edgar helped Catherine to feel more normal, at least what normal is for the society. Although I would argue that Catherine feels more at home when she is in Heathcliff’s presence than anyone else’s, the pair would not be able to coexist and they are very much the same person, as Catherine herself ratified when she declared that she was Heathcliff. Having two people with so much emotional passion would, without a doubt, eventually ruin them both. It can be said that the connection felt by Catherine and Heathcliff towards each other is not love, but obsession. Mere selfish obsession. That is why in Catherine and Heathcliff’s case, it is not due to outside forces that resulted in their physical and emotional separation, but it is because of themselves that they are unable to fulfill their love to each other.

  17. Nick

    We read chapter 10 in class this week, where Heathcliff returned back to Wuthering Heights after disappearing for 3 years. What I found interesting was in the first conversation between Catherine, Heathcliff and Edgar, since Heathcliff returned. Heathcliff says he was planning on making sure Catherine just saw her once, then went to go kill her brother, Hindley, as revenge, and then shoot himself in the head, avoiding capture. The response to this from Edgar was “Catherine, if we are to have cold tea, please come to the table,” (97). This doesn’t make any sense. One moment Heathcliff is telling of his plans for murdering Catherine’s brother and committing suicide, and the next, Linton complains about having cold tea. It’s as if that was a normal thing to say. I don’t know that much about Victorian conversations, but I don’t think that kind of response is rational in any circumstance. Catherine doesn’t even say anything after her husband interrupts, which is odd, considering that her “other half” was going to kill her brother. She must either really hate her brother like Heathcliff does, or maybe she was just too speechless to say anything. Either way, I don’t think that Emily Bronte wrote this part very well, which is a shame, as this is one of the most crucial parts in the story.

  18. tiffany

    Catherine’s grand pronouncement, “I am Heathcliff,” strikes me initially as the epitome of romantic desire; it comes early in the novel, and I did not expect things to go as badly. I increasingly understand what it means to be another, as well as oneself. With Heathcliff gone, Catherine marries the likable Edgar Linton, who is smitten with her. She moves into Thrushcross Grange. A few years later, Heathcliff, utterly altered, returns. Handsome, rich exuding a sense of power, he pronounces an implacable judgement on the events that have taken place. First, He indicts Edgar as an impossible love-object for someone of Catherine’s vital and generous nature. His most withering and tragic indictment, however, is of Catherine. In betraying him, she has betrayed herself. This is not mere rhetoric; Catherine, faced with the return of Heathcliff and his insistence on the wreckage her marriage has wrought, becomes ill. The novel is merciless in its almost clinical account of Heathcliff bearing down on Catherine to remind her of the criminality of her actions. This isn’t a simple argument in which one person tells another that he thinks she has done something wrong; here, everything Catherine has done, she has done to Heathcliff, as well.

  19. tiffany

    nevermind the last post
    Catherine’s grand pronouncement, “I am Heathcliff,” strikes me initially as the epitome of romantic desire; it comes early in the novel, and I did not expect things to go as badly. I increasingly understand what it means to be another, as well as oneself. With Heathcliff gone, Catherine marries the likable Edgar Linton, who is smitten with her. She moves into Thrushcross Grange. A few years later, Heathcliff, utterly altered, returns. Handsome, rich exuding a sense of power, he pronounces an implacable judgement on the events that have taken place. First, He indicts Edgar as an impossible love-object for someone of Catherine’s vital and generous nature. His most withering and tragic indictment, however, is of Catherine. In betraying him, she has betrayed herself. This is not mere rhetoric; Catherine, faced with the return of Heathcliff and his insistence on the wreckage her marriage has wrought, becomes ill. The novel is merciless in its almost clinical account of Heathcliff bearing down on Catherine to remind her of the criminality of her actions. This isn’t a simple argument in which one person tells another that he thinks she has done something wrong; here, everything Catherine has done, she has done to Heathcliff, as well. It appears as though Catherine and Heathcliff’s love is a manifestation of something more than just romantic love; it is an obsession for each other, for they cannot live without each other. The raw and powerful obsession shown between their rather crude exchanges are passionate and, according to me, is a form of romanticism I have never seen before. It is not flowery and fragrant; it is wild and rough, but it is very intense. In my opinion, Catherine’s justification of ‘helping Heathcliff’ by marrying Edgar is unacceptable, because she betrays her own obsession and love towards Heathcliff.

  20. tiffany

    blog no 3
    In the last few chapters that we read in class, I have noticed that Heathcliff experiences a development in his character. Hindley’s ill-treatment of him is a key point both in the novel and in the development of the character of Heathcliff, and it is the trigger to everything that goes so wrong in the end. Heathcliff forms a special bond with Catherine, and they spend a lot of time playing together out on the moors. One night they decide to go spy on the Lintons, which results in Catherine spraining her ankle and getting an invitation to stay until it is healed. Heathcliff, on the other hand, does not receive this invitation and must return to Wuthering Heights alone. The turning point of the novel is when Catherine finally comes home, and this is also when Heathcliff truly is contrasted for the first time. The Lintons are portrayed as fine, cultivated creatures, and what is worse; they seem to have tamed and made a lady out of Catherine. This makes a sharp contrast to the black haired and dirty Heathcliff who has kept in the background until Catherine calls him forth. She kisses him at first, and then she turns right around and laughs at him in his face for being so “black and cross”. Needless to say, this hurts him deeply and it has a major impact on his development throughout the rest of the novel. At first, he makes a serious attempt to change his appearance by having the housekeeper groom him. This is also the first time his appearance is thoroughly described, making it very hard for the reader to believe that such a face could ever be anything else than dark and wild in the comparison of the angel-like Lintons.

  21. Patricia

    I find it rather surprising how this week’s class discussions really reminds me of the painting ‘Heatcliff Returns’ that was shown on the first few days of english class. In this painting, Wuthering Heights was painted with black colors accompanied with dark colors for the dark sky as a background. In front of the house is a field of overgrown grass painted with dark shades of green but somewhat less darker than the house. What intrigues me is how the use of colors and details in the pictures portray the contrast between the Lintons and the Earnshaws. In class, we discusssed how the Lintons symbolized civiliszation and the Earnshaws symbolize barbaric savageness; and the Earnshaw’s savageness is reflected through the use of black color to paint the house. The use of pathetic fallacy is also evident in this painting when the painter uses dark sky, overgrown grass, and basically dark house with only some windows lit to give a very unwelcoming and inhospitable impression. Along with the tittle ‘Heathcliff Returns’ it is pretty clear that the painter has no intention of portraying Wuthering Heights as home. Another thing that I just thought of recently, was that the painting not only symbolizes the Earnshaws’ and Heathcliff’s violent and extreme behavior, it also reflects the painter’s interpretations of the Earnshaws and Heathcliff’s extreme behaviours. The painting shows a house in the country side and a person riding on a horse – this shows that the setting is more veered towards one of a victorian period than one of the twenty first century. In trying to interpret what Wuthering Heights might look like, the painter is able to tell us through his painting that this is what he thinks a house and setting of a victorian period might look like. Which then leads me to think that the symbolism of the savage Earnshaws and Heathcliff in the painting is what the painter assumes the people of the victorian era might think of them. The painter might be assuming that the people of that era – an era that supports the development and cultural values, and basically embracing civilization – considers the Earnshaws and Heathcliff as dark and is something that is not to be welcomed and embraced in that era. Which reminds me of the quote “I am Heathcliff”, and this leads me to another question: what would the people of that era think if they found out that there are some people like Catherine, who is able to be civilized, but on the inside is a violent person? Is that considered something common that this was written in a book? If not, how did someone like Emily Bronte come to think of such a character?

  22. JACKY CHAN

    wassssuupp… ummm this week class was pretty interesting, our reading of Wuthering heights in class, has opened my eyes to new insight about the characters in the book(suchhh as the conniving, nosy Nelly), and has helped shape my understanding of the time period in which it was written. A specific segment of the book i found oddly enthralling, was the scene in which Heathclifff comes back and, all hell break lose within the Linton residency, i thought the dynamic of Edgar’s tears, his sisters swoons and Nelly’s dreary predictions, quite amusing, Though i don’t like the book very much i do respect the fact that in that period Wuthering Heights was pretty hipster and different a novel, breaking the boundaries of what was considered acceptable to write in a very proper society, Annnnyhoo I hope that the weeks to come are full of dis-functional relationships, and ill mannered people, because that will mean i’m in Mr. Andrews class reading Wuthering Heights. -Jack

  23. Daphne Tan

    Catherine is a very interesting character. This week, the class read about the final moments before her death. What caught my attention is the event that happened a few chapters before her actual death. Heathcliff went and “secretly” met Catherine when Edgar was in church. Oddly, it was Nelly who brought him to her mistress despite her apparent dislike towards Catherine. The chapter then continues into a dialogue between Catherine and Heathcliff, and Catherine being Catherine spurted curse words and insults to Heathcliff despite the amount of trouble he went through to meet her.

    Catherine said that she was going to die because of him, and that she will curse him until he dies as well. She then continues by saying that Heathcliff will definitely forget about her and marry some other girl and have his own family after the years following her death. She said all this, knowing full well that she is going to die very soon. In my opinion, Catherine is very selfish in saying this to Heathcliff. By accusing him of the things he had not yet done, she places the feeling of regret and fault into Heathcliff’s mind. He will inevitably remember the words of his first love every time another woman arrives in his world. By saying what she said, Catherine places a grip on Heathcliff’s chance of obtaining happiness forever. That observation is proven right, for Heathcliff was miserable and bitter when we were first introduced to his character until the day he died.

    Again, I find Catherine’s definition of love to be very odd. Being brought up in a Christian school, I was told and taught multiple times that love is not selfish, impatient, rough, rude, nor mean. But the relationship between Catherine and Heathcliff (or at least, the relationship of Catherine towards Heathcliff) is all of that. I think that if Catherine really did love Heathcliff, she would have done everything she could to continue living for him, or at least put his mind at ease until the day she died. But she instead did the exact opposite and seemed as if she wanted to die instead of live. I personally would not want the person I love to live in bitterness and misery until the day they die.

  24. Hartini

    Hartini #2 –

    • Hi Mr Andrew, this is last week’s blog. ☺
    So sorry for the misunderstanding.

    There were a few things things that really stood out to me that revealed more about Catherine and Heathcliff’s relationship.

    First of all, the declaration “I am Heathcliff!” This bold romantic proclamation from Catherine gives us deeper insight into how she perceives him. She cares for him as much as she does herself, to the point that she feels that they are one. This statement also indirectly suggests that Catherine sees the similarities between her and Heathcliff (passionate, impulsive, aggressive) – similarities that brought them and kept them close together in such a sheltered community. The next quote that stuck to me was when Heathcliff says, “I love my murderer—but yours? How can I?” after Catherine apologizes to him fervently, just prior to her death. The way he describes his inability to forgive her for her downfall shows that he feels so much as one with her that he also feels the hurt inflicted on her. This quote tells us that Heathcliff not only loves and cares for Catherine,, but that he values more than he does himself. To him, she is more important than himself.
    In class, we also discussed Catherine’s strange behavior at certain points in the story. The first one was as she was nearing death. Her delirious state, to me, what the manifestation of her true personality. Her sickness brought her to a state in which she was no longer ashamed or held back in any way from expressing what she truly thinks and feels.
    Second of all was her irritated demeanor upon Heathcliff’s return, especially with regards to how she spoke of him to Isabella. To me, this does not indicate that Catherine loved Heathcliff any less than she used to, or that she is spiteful of him. In fact, the way she tried to stop Isabella from loving Heathcliff shows to me that she cares so much more than she dares to reveal. To me, the reason that she did so was to avoid seeing Heathcliff, the love of her life, in the hands of another. In a way, this is very selfish – she is not prepared to marry him, yet she is unwilling to let him go.
    Finally, minor point that crossed my mind was the timing of the Lintons’ death. The deaths of both of Edgar’s parents seem to have been caused by their efforts to take care of Catherine in her illness. To me, this is another example of how Catherine’s presence continues to the Linton family – first to Edgar, then the parents. Indirectly, she also hurt Isabella by causing Heathcliff’s vengeful marriage to her, prompted by her own marriage to Edgar. It’s quite interesting to see how Catherine seems to have cost the Lintons so much, from beginning to end. The significance of this thought, however, I am yet to discover.

  25. Patricia

    It’s been quite awhile since the last time I blogged. Well, since I can’t come up with something to blog about, I was pretty much stuck in typing up my blog. This week however, I guess I stumbled upon an interesting point I should blog about. To begin with, it was when I received a sheet of a quote from wuthering heights that I was suppose to do close reading on. I was surprised to find so much similarities within the story. In two seperate times Heathcliff said ‘About her I won’t speak; and I don’t desire to think; but i earnestly wish she were invisible: he presence invokes only maddening sensations’ and ‘five minutes ago Hareton seemed a personification of my youth, not a human being; I felt to him in such a variety of ways, that it would have been impossible to have accosted him rationally’. I think the reason Heathcliff loaths Cathy so much is because of how much she resembles her mother. I also think this is one of the reasons Emily Bronte uses the same names is to use it to symbolize how everything is similar and connected. The names Catherine, Edgar, Heathcliff, Linton, are repeated to resemble how in their social context, Catherine Earnshaw, Edgar Linton, and Heathcliff are like the ‘it’ group – the main characters where the story focus on, whereas Hindley and Hareton are more of the outliers of the ‘it’ group. The story begins with Heathcliff coming into the Earnshaw as a stranger and outsider of a different class – because he was a gypsy. However, Catherine ignores the fact that he is of different class and they became close friends – and later, passionate lovers. This is later reflected in the later part of the story with young Cathy, Hareton, and Linton. The use of similar names symbolize the deja Vu that was to happen in the later part of the story. Just like her mother, young Cathy is attracted to the ‘outlier’ Hareton, like Catherine was attracted to Heathcliff. The use of names was able to symbolize this similarity by using the name ‘Catherine’ who was in the ruling class – basically the ‘it’ group of people, and the use of a new name Hareton symbolizes how Heathcliff was also an outsider. Referring back to the quote, I find it interesting how Emily Bronte was able to create such a complex deja vu within in the ongoing plot, so similar that Heathcliff (one of the main characters of the story) was able to connect and feel the similarness of Cathy’s presence and Hareton’s personality to how he and Catherine was when they were young.

  26. During this week, of Wuthering heights, our class made posters depicting key characters in the book. The characters my group did were Hareton and Linton, two very different young men. A description of Hareton might be a manly, rugged, rude, yet quiet dude. Linton on the other hand was, sickly, pale, skinny, and pretty Linton family looking. These two men are quite a contrast which made for an interesting poster. I find very interesting to note that Linton, looks, and almost always acts nothing like his Dad.. Heathcliff,, while the son of the man he most hated in all the world(Hareton) seems to resemble heathcliff in a couple distinct ways. Lintons characteristics earn him scorn from Heathcliff, wishing the boy had never been born while some might argue Heathcliff had an unspoken love for Hareton. This new generation of teens in the book, bring out new questions, and irony’s i am going to enjoy pondering over this coming week!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s